Improvisational Theater

Thursday, May 30, 2013

Yes and please ask me about it...

As the book rounds out and I am seeing a finish-line, which may be a starting line, I realize that there are many things YOU may want to know, that I haven't addressed.  The book will be called Presently: Improv is Now.  Or something to that effect.  I would really, really, really love to field some of your questions about improvisational theater directly.  And the question you ask may likely end up in a section of the book, to be published.  Pretty please, ask away.......

5 comments:

kalimac said...

What is the most important lesson to learn to be good at improv?

andy said...

As an improviser, often times you're stuck playing with people you don't normally work with. What can you do if you end up in a scene that takes shape with no real narrative, or are in a scene with people who aren't on the same page as you (either mentally or physically)? - how do you work around that obstacle without stepping on toes?

Lexie Quandt said...

I have a question about negation in improv theatre. From the first day of my first improv class, I was taught to say "yes" and accept offers. I know this makes for a generally more entertaining scene when players are willing to take on the zany things someone might suggest. However, as I began to attend improv shows around the city of Portland and watch the famous troupes on YouTube, I noticed that "no" is used just as often as "yes". I would like to know what you have to say on this subject. I've always thought that negative characters still add humor to situations (for example: April Ludgate and Ron Swanson from the television series "Parks & Recreation"). I see the potential for many improv "games" where two players might continue suggesting ideas for activities and negating every single one of them. Is "no" an equally important tool as "yes" in improv?

Zakaria Mohamed said...

My question is about noticing the scene is becoming less and less enticing and want to make some objectives or suggestion to let the scene has some substance and progress. I would like to know how you would let the game be known or how the specific scene you are in is different than just people who have a relationship talking with one another? There is always a game to improv is what I think I have been taught. Does the game have to be something mind-blowing, shocking, exciting objectives? Free your mind and let the unexpected happen is what was taught with us all throughout 241 and 242. This question is more for Harolds really rather than free-form where there is a linear relationship with the characters, dialogue and events happening. I think I rambled too much without getting to the point. My question if I could write/say in a few words is what do you do when the scene is boring and the ones before you?

Sophya Vidal said...

How to you approach working with an improvisor who doesn't seem to respect you as a person? While I don't expect to be loved by everyone I meet, there is a hesitancy on my part to play vulnerably onstage when some treats you standoffishly offstage. Especially when I have not worked with them much before. I understand and look forward to the process of getting familiar with this new player, and was just wondering if you had any tips or suggestions on what I can do as I move forward.